— Stacy Besonen, Crow River Food Council Member. Feature image: The Little Boon Farm, Maple Lake, by Mary Sue Stevens.

Did you know, most Americans don’t know where their food comes from – let alone who grew it or how it was grown? Our connection to food has diminished to nothing more than a quick transaction at the check-out line, with no thought to who is behind the kale in our salads or the chicken on our grills. As a society, we know we are nature deprived. Not enough Vitamin D from the sun, not enough contact with the ground to literally ground us, not enough fresh air to breath deep! This is where Farms and Farmers Markets can play a role in reconnecting!

Farms and Farmers Markets reconnect communities to their food system. They create an opportunity where farmers can simultaneously sell fresh, local food and serve as food educators, revitalizing the way consumers shop and eat. They are places where farmers and neighbors meet to socialize and exchange ideas around cooking, nutrition, and agriculture. What produce is in season? What’s a healthy way to prepare asparagus? How do you raise your chicken? These answers can be found at a farm or farmers market – answers that educate, inform, and build relationships between communities, farmers, and food.

Farms and Farmers Markets reconnect a sense of community among their customers. Not only do patrons shop for farm fresh food, but they also engage in conversation, meet neighbors for lunch, and enjoy the festive atmosphere with family and friends. Research indicates people thrive and are naturally happier when socially connected. Farms and Farmers Markets support emotional health by creating a cheerful space where people come together for laughter, fellowship, food, and fun.

Farms and Farmers Markets reconnect us to healthy lifestyles and diets. Many local area Farmers Markets have the Power of Produce program (POP), where kids receive a $2 weekly token to purchase food themselves. Parents report that their kids, who participate in the program, eat more veggies! Farmers Markets in low-income areas also report increased consumption of vegetables among people within walking distance. To find a Farmers Market close to you, visit: https://minnesotagrown.com/.

baby-potatoes-farm-farming-775707Amelia from Sweet Beet Farm says, “People who visit our farm get to experience the process of small scale organic vegetable production systems. They get to observe the diversity of perennials and annual plants, pollinators, all working together.” Sweet Beet Farm, as well as other local farms, have several events inviting the public to come together to spend time eating, planting or working on big projects. If you want your kids to experience farm life, call a farmer and give your availability and the farmer can put together a work project for your family to get your hands in the dirt! For more information on events at Sweet Beet Farm check out their website at www.sweetbeetfarm.com.

Many local farms welcome visitors at most hours of the day, however, it a good idea to call and set up an appointment before your first visit. To find a farm close to you, visit: https://minnesotagrown.com/.

Farms and Farmers Markets bring people together and improve the health of the community!

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